Japanese knotweed growing in garden

Japanese knotweed - one plant you hopefully won’t see at the Chelsea Flower Show

The RHS Chelsea Flower Show opens today until 28th May. 

The grounds of the Royal Hospital Chelsea will be transformed, showing off some of the most spectacular garden designs in the world. Let's just hope that Japanese knotweed doesn't feature anywhere at the show!

Originally introduced into the UK as an ornamental plant in the 1820s, the Victorians considered Japanese knotweed a beautiful border shrub. It produces tiny creamy-white flowers in late summer, by which time the stems are up to 3 metres high and extremely dense. 

Japanese knotweed hu zhang

Does Japanese knotweed have any redeeming qualities?

Japanese knotweed (Fallopia Japonica), has earned itself a negative reputation in the UK.

Japanese knotweed is regarded as being the UK’s most aggressive and destructive plant, spreading across the UK and causing havoc to those unfortunate enough to own property in its way.  It’s undoubtedly a nuisance to have on your land. It causes damage to property, it's expensive to get rid of, and can potentially devalue your property.